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Trek back in time ‘to the real Nepal’

Trek back in time ‘to the real Nepal’ There’s little authentic trekking left on the famous Himalayan trails. But on a hike to a hidden glacier, our writer mucks in with the Sherpas and meets only villagers He ate all the rice. He threw rocks at the monkeys. He lied about the toilets and proved pathologically incapable of walking down a trail without veering off on some wild adventure. He sank the raft and brazenly encouraged hard drinking and ribaldry, especially among the old village ladies. Yes, Maila Gurung was undoubtedly one of the finest travel companions I have ever had the privilege to accompany. Continue reading… Go to Source Author: Kevin Rushby Tweet

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Big in Japan: dozens of adventure trips and activities

Big in Japan: dozens of adventure trips and activities From tropical scuba-diving to a samurai festival and skiing in perfect powder, these adventures are as varied as Japan’s climate Beyond the futuristic imagery of its cities, much of Japan is rural or wilderness, especially outside the Kanto and Kansai areas. In the bush you may spot local fauna, such as Japanese macaques (snow monkeys) in the mountains of Nagano, deer in Hiroshima and Nara, wild boar in the hills of Miyagi, foxes in Yamagata, and serows in Aomori. Your best bet for seeing ussuri (AKA grizzly) bears is in Hokkaido at Shiretoko national park, a Unesco world heritage site. Continue reading… Go to Source Author: Selena Hoy Tweet

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Off-peak: climbing Snowdonia’s smaller, quieter summits

Off-peak: climbing Snowdonia’s smaller, quieter summits The problem with climbing famous mountains like Snowdon is sharing them with thousands of others. So our writer finds a smaller Welsh peak that still makes her feel on top of the world Plus five more small peaks It’s easy to get carried away with celebrity – only to be disappointed when you eventually make the encounter. That was my experience of Snowdon – an A-list mountain. Standing at 1,085 metres, it’s the highest point in Wales and every year attracts hordes of people who want to stand on top of it. Such is its pull that there’s a cafe at the summit, a train (courtesy of the Victorians) to take you up…

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Ireland’s border country: walking the line and in love with the landscape

Ireland’s border country: walking the line and in love with the landscape Since the Brexit referendum, the Irish border has again become a source of tension but on the ground it remains a fascinating wilderness of low mountains and fantastic hiking country Today I’m hiking from Thur Mountain to the Cavan Burren along lanes and among prehistoric relics. This is north-west Ireland, not far from the sea but far enough for me to call it midlands. My route goes from Co Leitrim into Co Cavan, staying close to the border with Northern Ireland. For so long associated with violence and up against the appeal of the west coast, Ireland’s borderland has been ignored by travellers. Yet its history is…

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20 of the best adventure travel challenges for 2018

20 of the best adventure travel challenges for 2018 Marathon cycles meet epic swims and uplifting hikes in our guide to the best breaks that, from the Lake District to the Sahara, will get you off the sofa and into the great outdoors Continue reading… Marathon cycles meet epic swims and uplifting hikes in our guide to the best breaks that, from the Lake District to the Sahara, will get you off the sofa and into the great outdoors Continue reading… https://www.theguardian.com/uk/travel/rssTravel | The Guardian Latest travel news and reviews on UK and world holidays, travel guides to global destinations, city breaks, hotels and restaurant information from the Guardian, the world’s leading liberal voice https://assets.guim.co.uk/images/guardian-logo-rss.c45beb1bafa34b347ac333af2e6fe23f.pngTravel887 Tweet

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Mountains of the moon: climbing Uganda’s highest peak

Mountains of the moon: climbing Uganda’s highest peak The remote Rwenzori mountains, on the Uganda/DRC border, offer treks through varied and stunning landscapes, and Africa’s third-highest summit, with none of the crowds found at Kilimanjaro Claudius Ptolemy, the Greco-Roman mathematician, astronomer and father of geography, called the Rwenzori range the Mountains of the Moon, and I think he got it about right. Starlight beamed down on the convex glaciers surrounding our camp near Uganda’s western border, causing them to glow like resting lunar crescents. I should have been sleeping the night before my attempt on the Rwenzori’s loftiest peak, 5,109-metre Mount Stanley’s summit, Africa’s third-highest mountain, but altitude headaches kept me awake. I thought back to a similar sleepless…

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Mountain: a movie that reaches new peaks of cinematography

Mountain: a movie that reaches new peaks of cinematography Prepare to be taken to dizzying heights as a new documentary explores the physical beauty of the world’s highest places in ‘an exhilarating game of vertical pinball’ The world’s high places are having a moment. Not only is there a minor publishing boom in books about our fascination with mountains, there have been some dramatic films too, partly driven by advances in technology that allow us to get intimate with these rugged landscapes in ways we never have before. In the wake of Baltasar Kormákur’s Everest and the documentary Meru, both released in 2015, comes Mountain, an exploration of our modern fascination with the world’s orogenic zones. It is a…

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Mountain highs: trekking without borders in the Balkans

Mountain highs: trekking without borders in the Balkans It’s no easy stroll … but a spectacular new Balkan trail provides soaring peaks, lake views and memories of friendly locals – and real endeavour The views from Kosovo’s highest peak are incredible. Or so I’m told. It’s a tricky thing to confirm in blanket murk and howling winds. I’ve just leaned into a gale to reach the 2,656m summit of Mount Gjeravica, where a shabby concrete marker displays a defaced plaque commemorating Kosovo’s first and only Olympic medallist. At this point, the marker and the plaque are the only things I can see. All around, clouds rush and squalls blow. “Yesss!” shouts the man next to me, holding on to…

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