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The man who hiked 30 US national trails – in pictures

The man who hiked 30 US national trails – in pictures Photographer Bart Smith has been hiking the US’s national trails since 1992. Today he completes his 30th, the 3,700-mile Lewis and Clark trail, in time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Trails System Act. We select some of his best images from 25 years of walking Continue reading… Go to Source Author: Tweet

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Walks with a tale to tell – part 2

Walks with a tale to tell – part 2 Fascinating stories lie at the heart of these autumnal walks, as nature writers follow in the footsteps of a Pictish queen, an eccentric poet-priest, Charles Darwin and more Strolls with stories: part 1 Length/time 3½ miles, 2-3 hoursStart/finish Honister Slate Mine Refuel Sky Hi Cafe, at the mine Continue reading… Go to Source Author: Tweet

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UK walks with a tale to tell – part 1

UK walks with a tale to tell – part 1 Fascinating stories lie at the heart of these autumnal walks. From exploring dark history on the moors to Roman Britain, nature writers follow in fabled footsteps• See part 2 tomorrow Length/time 2¼ miles, 1-2 hours Start/finish Upper Birks car parkRefuel Aberfeldy Watermill or Birks Cinema Continue reading… Go to Source Author: Guardian Staff Tweet

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A country diarist walks the Vale of Llangollen

A country diarist walks the Vale of Llangollen William Hazlitt, one of Britain’s finest essayists, discovered the ‘natural mysteries’ of this part of north Wales more than 200 years ago. Henry Eliot follows his lead “One of the pleasantest things in the world is going a journey,” wrote the essayist, William Hazlitt, “but I like to go by myself.” Hazlitt was 19 when he first met Samuel Taylor Coleridge, in January 1798. The poet was impressed by the earnest youth and invited him to visit Nether Stowey in Somerset, where he was working with William Wordsworth on what would become the Lyrical Ballads, the founding text of English Romanticism. Continue reading… Go to Source Author: Henry Eliot Tweet

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The new mother’s tale: a Kent walk in Chaucer’s footsteps

The new mother’s tale: a Kent walk in Chaucer’s footsteps Some of the pilgrims’ routes are now roads but Mary-Ann Ochota finds a short bucolic stretch in the Kent Downs perfect for a first hike with her infant son In 1170, Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, was murdered in his cathedral. In the centuries that followed, hundreds of thousands of people made the pilgrimage through the Kentish countryside to pray at his shrine. As Geoffrey Chaucer famously describes: From every shire’s end/Of England, to Canterbury they wend/The holy blissful martyr for to seek/That him hath helped when that they were sick”. Continue reading… Go to Source Author: Mary-Ann Ochota Tweet

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Mount Taranaki: will the New Zealand peak’s ‘living person’ status bring respect?

Mount Taranaki: will the New Zealand peak’s ‘living person’ status bring respect? The North Island mountain is to get the same rights as people and, amid environmental concerns, the Māori community hopes this will mean tourists treat it with care New Zealand must feel like the reserved sibling in a family of exhibitionists. You have big, brash Australia to one side, the dreamy, tropical South Pacific isles above and alluring, mysterious Antarctica to the south. Which could go some way to explaining why New Zealand has been left off so many maps of the world, from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum to those simple cartographic artworks by the likes of Starbucks and Ikea. Last month, Tourism NZ launched a…

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20 great traditional festivals in Europe

20 great traditional festivals in Europe A festival adds fun to a holiday. Our writers pick less-heralded summer events they’ve found in small-town Europe – from France and Spain to Greece and Sweden Fête de la Saint-Louis, Sète, Languedoc When: 23-28 August Highlight: The final night’s firework display Continue reading… https://www.theguardian.com/uk/travel/rssTravel | The GuardianLatest travel news and reviews on UK and world holidays, travel guides to global destinations, city breaks, hotels and restaurant information from the Guardian, the world’s leading liberal voicehttps://assets.guim.co.uk/images/guardian-logo-rss.c45beb1bafa34b347ac333af2e6fe23f.pngTravel887Guardian Staff -geoquono- Tweet

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Little Britain: 10 of the UK’s best tiny attractions

Little Britain: 10 of the UK’s best tiny attractions From a museum in a phonebox to a theatre with just 55 seats, we pick 10 pint-size treats from Dixe Wills’s new book on the nation’s tiny treasures Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset Nothing says British seaside like a pier, and as an example of British understatement, Burnham-on-Sea’s, at just 37 metres long, has no equal. The minuscule structure looks even smaller against the vast expanse of sand and mudflats on which it sits. This coast experiences the second-highest tidal range in the world (after the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia) and at low tide the sea is a mile and a half away. Continue reading… https://www.theguardian.com/uk/travel/rssTravel | The GuardianLatest travel news…

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Nîmes’ stunning new Roman museum dazzles in a glass ‘toga’

Nîmes’ stunning new Roman museum dazzles in a glass ‘toga’ As the French city bids for Unesco heritage status, the stylish Musée de la Romanité shows off the extensive treasures of Roman Nîmes Nîmes’ spectacular Musée de la Romanité will open on 2 June in a €59.5m complex next to the city’s equally imposing 20,000-seat Arènes de Nîmes – an amphitheatre used for events such as the recent Great Roman Games. The new museum, which will have free admission during its opening weekend, was designed by Brazilian-born architect Elizabeth de Portzamparc, who has incorporated waxed concrete, aluminium, wood and glass into the three giant rectangular buildings, the largest of which is swathed in a toga of glass tiles and…

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Harlem’s renaissance: how art, food and history are shaping its latest evolution

Harlem’s renaissance: how art, food and history are shaping its latest evolution The Harlem EatUp! food festival starts on 14 May – just one opportunity residents and enthusiastic newcomers have to celebrate and develop the culture of this historic New York district It was after midnight on a Wednesday and Paris Blues, Harlem’s oldest surviving jazz bar, was standing-room only. The dive has remained, stubbornly, much the way it has since it opened in 1969. There’s neither a cover charge nor fancy cocktails and patrons can help themselves to barbecued chicken and other comfort food for free. In the corner, Samuel Hargress Jr, the 81-year-old owner who lives on the premises, was holding court in a fedora and tweed…

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