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Kind of blue: Porto’s azulejo facades – in pictures

Kind of blue: Porto’s azulejo facades – in pictures In our weekly look at travel through three Instagram shots, Sam Jemai gets fired up by Porto’s famous blue tiles Continue reading… In our weekly look at travel through three Instagram shots, Sam Jemai gets fired up by Porto’s famous blue tiles Continue reading… https://www.theguardian.com/uk/travel/rssTravel | The Guardian Latest travel news and reviews on UK and world holidays, travel guides to global destinations, city breaks, hotels and restaurant information from the Guardian, the world’s leading liberal voice https://assets.guim.co.uk/images/guardian-logo-rss.c45beb1bafa34b347ac333af2e6fe23f.pngTravel887 Tweet

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Ethiopia’s living churches – in pictures

Ethiopia’s living churches – in pictures As one of the first countries to adopt Christianity, Ethiopia has a legacy of churches and monasteries, built on hilltops or hewn out of cliff faces, as well as vibrant traditions of worship. These are celebrated in a lavish book, Ethiopia: The Living Churches of an Ancient Kingdom Continue reading… As one of the first countries to adopt Christianity, Ethiopia has a legacy of churches and monasteries, built on hilltops or hewn out of cliff faces, as well as vibrant traditions of worship. These are celebrated in a lavish book, Ethiopia: The Living Churches of an Ancient Kingdom Continue reading… https://www.theguardian.com/uk/travel/rssTravel | The Guardian Latest travel news and reviews on UK and world…

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Take the kids to … Lappa Valley Steam Railway, Cornwall

Take the kids to … Lappa Valley Steam Railway, Cornwall With miniature steam engines, a special Santa train, a lake and maze, this charming small attraction near Newquay is a great day out for families with younger children Board a narrow-gauge (15in) vintage steam train and weave through leafy woodland to the site of historic East Wheal Rose mine. Once there, paddle a canoe or giant swan around the boating lake, explore gentle nature trails or the wooden fortress, play crazy golf and ride more tiny rare trains, such as the 7¼-inch woodland railway, with sit-astride benches. Continue reading… With miniature steam engines, a special Santa train, a lake and maze, this charming small attraction near Newquay is a…

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Get a kick out of karate at Okinawa’s new fight club

Get a kick out of karate at Okinawa’s new fight club With karate now included in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games, we check out a new complex dedicated to the martial art on Japan’s most southerly islands Spinning, hissing, arms and legs pistoning: the 12 men are like steam locomotives. Karate master Morio Higaonna is supervising their training session. His attention turns to me. “It’s no good just watching,” he says. “You have to take part.” Higaonna takes one of my hands and interlaces his fingers with mine in what would be, in other contexts, an intimate clasp. There is a pause before, with shocking rapidity, he pulls my fingers up and back. I swear loudly and flap my…

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Great Scott: walking Scotland’s Rob Roy Way

Great Scott: walking Scotland’s Rob Roy Way Sir Walter Scott’s account of the lawless life of Rob Roy was published 200 years ago. And today, hikers can follow in his cattle-rustling footsteps on a footpath across central Scotland Hero, thief, extortioner, loyal Jacobite, traitor or Scotland’s very own Robin Hood. Any of these epithets can be used to describe Rob Roy MacGregor, and will at least be partly true. The outlaw, whose fame was sealed 200 years ago this New Year’s Eve with the publication of Sir Walter Scott’s fictionalised account of episodes from his life, is one of history’s true enigmas. Continue reading… Sir Walter Scott’s account of the lawless life of Rob Roy was published 200 years…

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In Grandpa’s footsteps on the shores of Carlingford Lough, Ireland

In Grandpa’s footsteps on the shores of Carlingford Lough, Ireland Hannah Louise Summers uses a new ferry service – a lake crossing on which her grandfather once worked – to explore both sides of Carlingford Lough, which straddles the Irish border Every school holiday was the same. For hours we’d trundle south from Belfast in my grandpa’s battered blue minibus – a journey dotted with punctures, Werther’s Originals and mugs of tea. We’d cross the border, stop for a loaf of bread and a scratchcard, and finally pull into Omeath, the small village on Carlingford Lough where my grandpa grew up. Here, on a hill overlooking the water, granny and grandpa had a pea-green static caravan. Trapped in the…

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Toon and Tyne: Newcastle united … on a city walking tour

Toon and Tyne: Newcastle united … on a city walking tour From the grandeur of Grey Street and Central station to the bridges over the Tyne, this walk takes in Newcastle’s fine Victorian architecture and industrial heritage Just as the King Edward Bridge over the Tyne is about the most dramatic rail approach in the land, so the crossings visible down the gorge provide an equally impressive finale for the visiting walker. But first, there is the small matter of the city itself. Don’t leave Newcastle Central station without taking in the iron majesty of the place. If you sense that you have arrived in one of the great industrial cathedrals of the 19th century, there is a reason….

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Take the kids to … Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway

Take the kids to … Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway This dream of a narrow-gauge railway and its one-third size trains make for a grand day out packing in great coastal views and fine fish and chips along the way A 90-year-old narrow (15in) gauge steam and diesel railway stretching 14 miles from Hythe to Dungeness on the Channel coast. Everything’s on a titchy scale – from the platforms to the vintage wooden carriages – and wonderful wafts of soot pervade the route and its environs. My family has visited several times and the kids’ reaction when six and seven on arriving at Dymchurch station was always one of unalloyed joy. You may find some of that joy flattens…

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Titanic Hotel Belfast: review

Titanic Hotel Belfast: review The former Harland & Wolff headquarters has been turned into a light, bright hotel that does full justice to this architectural and historical gem Belfast people can be a little queasy about things Titanic. Even before the 2012 centenary of its sinking, I heard one woman – contemplating a jar of Titanic jam in a Belfast deli – declare herself “Titanicked out.” However, on a Friday night there are Belfast accents aplenty in the bars of the new Titanic Hotel: people gathering for functions here or in the nearby Titanic Visitor Centre (named the world’s leading tourist attraction last year), or simply popping in to check out a new place in town. Continue reading… The…

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Revolutionary road: on the trail of Che Guevara’s last days in Bolivia

Revolutionary road: on the trail of Che Guevara’s last days in Bolivia Ahead of the 50th anniversary of Che’s death, our writer follows in his final footsteps in the Bolivian villages of La Higuera and Vallegrande Deep in southern Bolivia – where peaks andcacti soar and condors glide – is a cluster of white-washed homes and a former classroom turned shrine. Inside this school house, 50 years ago this October, the world’s most famous revolutionary, Ernesto “Che” Guevara, was executed. Continue reading… Ahead of the 50th anniversary of Che’s death, our writer follows in his final footsteps in the Bolivian villages of La Higuera and Vallegrande Deep in southern Bolivia – where peaks andcacti soar and condors glide –…

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